Life in Finland

One of the strengths of Finnish higher education institutions are the modern learning environments and facilities. Our high-quality classrooms and virtual learning environments, and free libraries enable students the best possible learning experience. Recent surveys say that international students enjoy the campus environment and their institutions’ eco-friendly attitude. Also, the design and the quality of the campus buildings, and the surroundings outside the campus inspire international students in their everyday life. Student unions and associations look after students’ interests and
You have two main options when searching for accommodation: established student housing foundations and the private market. Student housing providers are listed on the SOA (Finnish Student Housing Ltd.) website . The average monthly rent for a single room in a shared student flat ranges from around €160 - €380. Single apartments or family flats are also available, but the rent is likely to be higher in these non-shared apartments and they often have long waiting lists. You can also arrange housing independently by searching for rented flats on the open market or on social media. Open market
Finnish higher education institutions offer a range of scholarship options for those non-EU/EEA students who are required to pay tuition fees. The kinds of scholarship available and any tuition fees you are expected to cover will depend on the institution and the degree programme in question. Check the details for each programme in the Studyinfo.fi degree programme descriptions and contact the institution you are applying to for further advice. Remember that in addition to tuition fees, you are also expected to cover your living expenses . Doctoral level scholarships In Finland, tuition fees
Applying for degrees studies in Finland is done online at Studyinfo.fi . There are two main application periods a year for studies commencing in autumn: Applications for bachelor’s programmes are made in January Applications for university master's programmes are made between late November/early December and mid/late January. Some degree programmes may also have additional application periods outside the main application window. More information on application periods is available at Studyinfo.fi . For more advice on your application, get in touch with the Admissions Services of the university
Finnish higher education institutions currently offer over 400 bachelor’s and master’s degree programmes taught in English. Doctoral study and research options are available, too. Most of the bachelor’s degree programmes taught in English are offered by universities of applied sciences (UAS), whereas most of the master’s programmes taught in English are offered by universities. Find a programme You can get more information on all programmes taught in English from the Studyinfo.fi portal. If you need detailed information on the eligibility requirements and the admissions process, get in touch

Admissions

Five Steps to Studying in Finland 1. Choose Your Programme There are hundreds of programmes for you to choose from. Visit www.studyinfo.fi for details on each programme. 2. Check Admissions Information Make sure you know about the eligibility criteria, application process and deadlines, and any documents you will need to provide as part of your application. Also check if you need to take an entrance exam or another kind of aptitude test to get onto your programme of choice. You can always get in touch with the Admissions Office at the university you are interested in if you have any further

Study in Finland at EHEF Indonesia 2018

Come and visit our Study in Finland booth to learn more about your study options in Finnish universities and universities of applied sciences. We offer hundreds of different English-taught study programmes at both Bachelor's and Master's levels.

Diaconia University of Applied Sciences

Diak is Finland’s largest provider of UAS-level education in social work. Our part-time BA and MA programmes focus on themes such as community development work, people’s participation and empowerment, human rights and conflict resolution as well as global health care.